Chronic Pain

Pain is normal. It is a protective response of the body to avoid potential tissue damage.

Chronic pain is a pain that has been present longer than the natural healing time of an injury, generally longer than three months. There are certain signs even in the early days following an acute pain episode that may suggest a higher likelihood of developing chronic pain so the best management strategies are to stop pain in its tracks early.

When pain does persist, sometimes the initial injury has resolved but the disability associated with the injury continues. This is a confusing situation for the person experiencing the pain and creates a lack of understanding as to how to act and participate in daily life.

The experience of pain does not always mean that there is structural damage and may be a maladaptation of the warning system of the body. This warning system can be useful in the early stages of pain to avoid threat and prevent further injury - think of the pain we get if we place our hand on a hot plate. In many patients with chronic pain, we often find this warning system continues to be highly active despite there being no ongoing threat or damage. There are many factors that can influence the dialling up or down of this warning system such as inactivity and deconditioning, poor pacing of activities, high stress and tension, poor sleeping patterns amongst other factors.

At WCPC, we understand the latest research in pain science and spend time exploring the individual factors influencing YOUR pain presentation. We work together with you using evidence based management strategies to reduce your pain levels, improve your function and quality of life and get you back to the activities you love.